Monitoring Sweatshops Workers, Consumers, and the Global Apparel Industry by Jill Esbenshade

Cover of: Monitoring Sweatshops | Jill Esbenshade

Published by Temple University Press .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Manufacturing industries,
  • Work & labour,
  • Sociology - General,
  • Industries - Textile Industry,
  • Clothing workers,
  • Wages,
  • Business & Economics,
  • Politics / Current Events,
  • Public Policy - General,
  • Business/Economics,
  • Labor,
  • Government & Business,
  • Labor & Industrial Relations - General,
  • Clothing trade,
  • Sweatshops,
  • Globalization

Book details

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
Number of Pages272
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8859853M
ISBN 101592132553
ISBN 109781592132553

Download Monitoring Sweatshops

Monitoring Sweatshops is the best analysis to date of monitoring that is designed to placate consumers and maintain the status quo. Anyone concerned about the conditions under which our clothes are made should read this book."Author: Jill Esbenshade.

Monitoring Sweatshops book Monitoring, Sweatshops, and Labor Relations 1 1 The Rise and Fall of the Social Contract in the Apparel Industry 13 2 The Social-Accountability Contract 33 3 Private Monitoring in Practice 60 4 Weaknesses and Conflicts in Private Monitoring 89 5 The Development of International Monitoring "In this important book, Jill Esbenshade skillfully pieces together a mass of evidence that challenges the wisdom and effectiveness of private monitoring as practiced in the global apparel This is an ambitious book that draws on rich interview data and case study materials to weave together a complex story of the various corporate, grass roots.

Monitoring Sweatshops offers the first comprehensive assessment of efforts to address and improve conditions in garment factories. Jill Esbenshade describes the government's efforts to persuade retailers and clothing companies to participate in private monitoring programs.

Monitoring Sweatshops offers the first comprehensive assessment of sweatshop monitoring. Within, readers will learn of the government's efforts to persuade retailers and clothing companies to monitor themselves with the use of private : Jill Esbenshade. This book has argued that private monitoring has not been successful in ameliorating the sweatshop problem because of flaws in the way monitoring is carried out and the conflicts of interest involved, and also that private monitoring does not address fundamental problems in the structure of the industry such as secrecy, mobility, workers.

Monitoring Sweatshops offers the first comprehensive assessment of efforts to address and improve conditions in Monitoring Sweatshops book factories.

Jill Esbenshade describes the government's efforts to persuade retailers and clothing companies to participate in private monitoring programs.

She shows the different approaches to monitoring that firms have taken, and the variety of Monitoring Sweatshops book monitors employed, from. Monitoring Sweatshops offers the first comprehensive assessment of efforts to address and improve conditions in garment factories.

Jill Esbenshade describes the government's efforts to persuade Monitoring Sweatshops book and clothing companies to participate in private monitoring programs. Monitoring Sweatshops offers the first comprehensive assessment of sweatshop monitoring. Within, readers will learn of the government's efforts to persuade retailers and clothing companies to monitor themselves with the use of private monitors.

The author shows the different approaches firms have taken, and the range of monitors chosen, from Author: Jill Esbenshade. Monitoring Sweatshops offers the first comprehensive assessment of efforts to address and improve conditions in garment factories. Jill Esbenshade describes the government's efforts to persuade retailers and clothing companies to participate in private monitoring programs.

She shows the different Price: $ Monitoring Sweatshops: Workers, Consumers, and the Global Apparel Industry As of Augthe ILR Review is published by SAGE.

Please visit the journal site to read this by: Book Review: Monitoring Sweatshops: Workers, Consumers, and the Global Apparel Industry, Unsocial Europe: Social Protection or Flexploitation?, The Sign of the Burger: McDonald's and the Culture of Author: Nick Nye, Michael Gold, Tony Cutler.

Monitoring, Sweatshops, and Labor Relations Monitoring is the anti-sweatshop movement’s great hope. —New York Times,Ap In a factory in downtown Los Angeles, Latino immigrants toil away producing garments for Los Angeles’s largest apparel company, GUESS?, Inc.

The Korean-owned factory is one of many sewing shops in. Monitoring Sweatshops offers the first comprehensive assessment of efforts to address and improve conditions in garment factories. Jill Esbenshade describes the government's efforts to persuade retailers and clothing companies to participate in private monitoring programs.

You can write a book review and share your experiences. Other. Sweatshop (or sweat factory) is a term for a workplace with very poor, socially unacceptable or illegal working conditions.

The work may be difficult, dangerous, climatically challenging or underpaid. Workers in sweatshops may work long hours with low pay, regardless of laws mandating overtime pay or a minimum wage; child labor laws may also be violated.

Monitoring Sweatshops: Workers, Consumers and the Global Apparel Jill Esbenshade. Temple University Press, pp. Cloth, $; paper, $ field of monitoring and certifying labor practices in global manufacturing of consumer products for over two decades. I am the author of Monitoring Sweatshops: Workers, Consumers and the Global Apparel Industry (), and other subsequent reports, articles, and book chapters on labor policies and practices in California and in the global economy.

Visit to get more information about this book, to buy it in print, or to download it as a free PDF. Monitoring International Labor Standards: Summary of Domestic Forums. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

doi: / ‘The term ‘sweatshops’ is a dirty word to students on American campuses and activists around the world, implying exploited workers toiling in horrible conditions for long hours at low pay. Powell's splendid new book gives us another perspective: how workers view sweatshops as an opportunity for improving their economic by: Nike wasn't the only or worst company to use sweatshops.

But it was the one everybody knew. Transparency doesn't change ongoing reports of abuses, still-low wages, or tragedies like the one in. E-Book: The only comprehensive historical analysis of the globalization of the U.S. apparel industry, this book focuses on the reemergence of sweatshops in the United States and the growth of new ones abroad.

Ellen Israel Rosen, who has spent more than a decade investigating the problems of America's domestic apparel workers, now probes the shifts in trade policy and global. Follow Us. Movement.

Staff. Monitoring Sweatshops: Workers, Consumers, and the Global Apparel Industry Article in Industrial and Labor Relations Review January with Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Buy Monitoring Sweatshops by Jill Esbenshade from Waterstones today. Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £Author: Jill Esbenshade. Sweatshops are still supplying high street brands More than a decade after sweatshop labour for top brands became a mainstream issue, the problem still.

Sweatshops often involve poverty-level wages, excessive hours of labour, and unsafe or unhealthful workplace n social and economic conditions are necessary for sweatshops to be possible: (1) a mass of unskilled and unorganized labourers, often including children, (2) management systems that neglect the human factor of labour, and (3) lack of accountability for poor working.

In the world of those who pay attention to monitoring sweatshops (a sadly small world), Nike wasn’t exactly a success story, but it was a tale one could tell about how public pressure could force a corporation to improve its conditions and acquiesce to independent monitoring systems.

The concern for displacement is often alluded to in much of the literature and more directly in Jill L. Esbenshade, Monitoring Sweatshops: Workers, Consumers, and the Global Apparel Industry (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, ); "Overview of Global Developments and Office Activities Concerning Codes of Conduct, Social Labelling and Cited by:   But as WRC-founder Jill Esbenshade conclusively proves in her book "Monitoring Sweatshops," private monitoring and self-imposed codes of conduct achieve little without a source of outside : Jake Blumgart.

The fallout from Sinclair’s book and led to strong federal legislation that improved working conditions throughout the United States. The issue of sweatshops again is a hot topic in the media. However, today’s issue does not deal The organization demands File Size: KB.

Paperback. Condition: New. Language: English. Brand new Book. Monitoring Sweatshops offers the first comprehensive assessment of efforts to address and improve conditions in garment factories.

Jill Esbenshade describes the government's efforts to persuade retailers and clothing companies to participate in private monitoring programs. Monitoring Sweatshops: Workers, Consumers and the Global Apparel Industry (review) Her book, a doctoral dissertation revised, is a focused and effective examination of the code of conduct.

Wal-Mart’s Sweatshop Monitoring Fails to Catch Violations: The Story of Toys Made in China for Wal-Mart CONTENTS List of 5 Toy Factories: Names and Addresses Executive Summary 1.

Introduction: China’s Export-Oriented Toy Industry 2. Wal-Mart’s Unethical Sourcing Policy 3. Five Chinese Supplier Factories of Wal-MartFile Size: KB. Representatives of two of the nation's major sweatshop monitoring organizations debated the merits of full public disclosure and independent monitoring in a panel discussion at the Yenching.

The article reviews several book on urban studies including "The Cybercities Reader," edited by Stephen Graham, "Industrial Districts: A New Approach to Industrial Change," by Giacomo Becattini, "Monitoring Sweatshops: Workers, Consumers and the Global Apparel Industry," by Jill Esbenshade.

Definition of Sweatshop. According to Webster's Dictionary, a sweatshop is 'a usually small manufacturing establishment employing workers under unfair and. Whichever monitoring organization a company might use (and there are many more), the bottom-line concern among anti-sweatshop activists lies in the lack of transparency to the consumer of the findings, as well as the inability of inspectors to stay aware of factory conditions at all times.

The most recent order I placed on Amazon was for birthday gifts. A paper airplane kit, a book, a Paper Jamz guitar, plus a few other random items the. WHAT TO DO ABOUT SWEATSHOPS A sweatshop is a business, often a factory or production facility, where local laws governing the workplace are broken and employees are exploited by their employer.

The employee abuse may be related to very low wages. “Amazon’s system of employee monitoring is the most oppressive I have ever come across,” writes Simon Head in his book Mindless: Why Smarter Machines are Making Dumber Humans, which you can buy on Amazon by the way 😉.

With its “state-of-the-art surveillance technology. - Sweatshops are responsible for making much of the clothes in the world today - Sweatshops exist around the world - Sweatshops affect many countries, communities, and individuals As a result of this lesson, students will be able to - Discuss what a sweatshop is, and File Size: KB.Cal-Safety's Flawed Monitoring Methodology.

Information about the above examples of Cal Safety's monitoring track record is complemented by the results of a thorough investigation into Cal Safety's monitoring methodology by Dr. Jill Esbenshade, presented in the recently released book. As I discuss in my forthcoming book, Sweatshops: Improving Lives and Economic Growth, while 77 percent of Bangladeshis live on less than $2 Author: Capital Flows.

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